The Zimbabwe Sanctions Real Plan

“So if we decide to try and work for change in power in Zimbabwe, I would hope that we would have the wisdom to be discrete, to be low-key and to avoid giving those in power there the excuse that foreigners are out to get them. We would treat Zimbabwe basically as a pariah under this option. We would disengage from official government-to-government relationships, programming of any sort, and wait for the pressures to mount, helping them along as best as we can”Ambassador Crocker; before passing ZIDERA

The Dutch government proposed what they described as creativity in implementing the sanctions which, it hoped , would help disguise the debilitating economic impact “For example, governments could use ‘moral suassion’ rather than an investment ban, with press statements such as ‘it is inconceivable to do business in Zimbabwe. Tesco,  UK has stopped buying from Zimbabwe, and Shell is also considering a sale of assets in Zimbabwe” – Leaked Cable from WikiLeaks

THE European Union considered “creative” means of presenting sanctions against Zimbabwe to hide their full economic impact, according to a confidential United States State Department cable released by WikiLeaks.

 

The cable shows that under a sanctions plan code named ‘reftel b’, the EU considered imposing a complete investment ban on Zimbabwe. But the proposal came unstuck when it was realised that British and American companies with operations in the country would be affected.

 

“The United Kingdom will push for further measures, including an investment ban, to be enacted in September (2008),” the US embassy cable read. “However, the remaining foreign investments in Zimbabwe are British and American, and pursuing an investment ban is difficult.”

 

The Dutch government then proposed what they described as creativity in implementing the sanctions which, it was hoped, would help disguise their debilitating economic impact. “For example, governments could use ‘moral suasion’ rather than an investment ban, with press statements such as ‘it’s inconceivable to do business in Zimbabwe. Tesco, UK, has stopped buying from Zimbabwe, and Shell is also considering a sale of assets in Zimbabwe,” the cable added.

 

Western countries have always claimed that the sanctions do not affect the majority of Zimbabweans and only target individuals accused of rights abuses and electoral fraud.